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PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 11:23 am 
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I am currently (amongst other things) looking in to installing a black water treatment system to manage our waste and hopefully reuse on the garden. We have a very aged leach drain that we had to repair once and would like to be doing the right thing and making sure that things get managed before they run in to trouble, again.
Before Christmas I was looking at a Biolytix system and there was a GREAT special!
Got told yesterday they are bankrupt :cry: and those that ordered a system are now out of pocket. (one spent $13000-00) Phew that was a little too close. (Note to self, don't pay until you have the goods.) Mine would not have been quite that much I don't think.
I have been told Aquarius is a better system. Does anyone have any info that might help me out?

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 3:18 pm 
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A bit of info hear about the collapse about a month ago, it's a shame.. Bit of discussion here:

http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/1623608

Yes seems they took 50% deposit up front, then the rest on delivery so a few people have missed out. That old story by the sounds of it, you might have a good idea and a good product, but that doesn't mean your a good business person.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 9:46 pm 
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Is it something that you can make(DIY). I build a float tank for $300 cos a retail one is $15000 ish.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 10:55 pm 
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Umm, maybe! But because it is black water treatment it requires council approval, and I think it is out of my realm of expertise. Actually it is all getiing too hard and too expensive. After contacting the council health dept. today and asking "what systems for black water treatment are approved in the City of Cockburn?" I got a link
http://www.health.wa.gov.au/home/search ... sa.y=8#845
Seemed like a good idea, but time, understanding and $$$ are outweighing the project. :sad2:

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 11:03 pm 
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Location: Bassendean West Australia Mediteranean climate (perth)
What about a composting loo?
Build a outside dunny to house it in.
And reuse grey water, harvest rainwater as well and you would not be wasting much.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2011 11:17 pm 
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Those biomax type systems can be a bit of a PITA, with ongoing maintinance and costs, A properly used septic and leach drain will rarely require any work and you can still use the water being leached out of the leach drain by strategically planting and orchard in the leach zone.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 25, 2011 12:44 am 
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skipd wrote:
What about a composting loo?
Build a outside dunny to house it in.
And reuse grey water, harvest rainwater as well and you would not be wasting much.

Huh, funnily enough when we were in Queensland a few years ago we hired a car and visited the home of the Nature loo. We took friends who made crappy jokes and reckoned they had a shit time. Swore that if we got a composting toilet they'd never eat my home grown veges ever again.
Is Biomax the same as Biolytix Simo?

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 25, 2011 9:22 am 
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Now this might not work for everyone. But as a way to remove a huge amount of load on an existing system, humanure composting is great. Humanure composting isn't really like a composting toilet which usually have quite a bit of issues. And humanure composting doesn't require "replacing" the existing approved system. To a large extent, it just ignores it.
There is generally no regulation if the house has an approved system, no rules require you to use it. Backyard composting is generally of no concern to the council as long as you manage it well and it isn't a nuisance.
To read an older edition of the book free online http://www.weblife.org/humanure/default.html

Or go to the headquarters http://www.humanurehandbook.com/
And they also have a message board http://www.jenkinspublishing.com/messages/


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 25, 2011 11:17 am 
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Thanks TC, had a quick squiz and it looks very interesting! :thumb:

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 25, 2011 2:49 pm 
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Faye wrote:
.
Is Biomax the same as Biolytix Simo?



I think so Faye :learn:

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 5:29 pm 
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Wow, thanks for that link TC... Well worth reading, who would have thought that a book about human poo could be so all encompassing.. Here's a little excerpt, and the link again to the online version. This excerpt comes from the chapter "THE EGO VS. THE ECO"

http://www.weblife.org/humanure/

READ THIS, I think it's bloody brilliant, encapsulates life so very well...

Quote:
Human beings, like all living things on this planet, are inextricably intertwined with all of the elements of nature. We are threads in the tapestry of life. We constantly breathe the atmosphere that envelopes the planet; we drink the fluids that flow over the planet's surface; we eat the organisms that grow from the planet's skin. From the moment an egg and a sperm unite to spark our existence, each of us grows and develops from the elements provided by the Earth and sun. In essence, the soil, air, sun, and water combine within our mother's womb to mold another living creature. Nine months later, another human being is born. That person is a separate entity, with an awareness of an individual self, an Ego. That person is also totally a part of, and completely dependent upon, the surrounding natural world, the Eco.

When the ego and the eco are balanced, the creature lives in harmony with the planet. In this theory, such a balance is considered to be the true meaning of spirituality, because the individual is a conscious part of, attuned to, and in harmony with a greater level of actual Being. When too much emphasis is placed on the self, the ego, an imbalance occurs and problems result, especially when that imbalance is collectively demonstrated by entire cultures. To suggest that these problems are only environmental, and therefore not of great concern, is incorrect. Environmental problems (damage to the eco) ultimately affect all living things, as all living things derive their existence, livelihood, and well-being from the planet. We cannot damage a thread in the web of life without the risk of fraying the entire tapestry.

When the ego gets blown out of proportion, we get thrown off balance in a variety of ways. Our educational institutions teach us to idolize the intellect, often at the expense of our moral, ethical, and spiritual development. Our economic institutions urge us to be consumers, and those who have gained the most material wealth are glorified. Our religious institutions often amount to little more than systems of human-worship, where divinity is only personified in human form, and only human creations (e.g., books and buildings) are considered sacred.

By emphasizing the intellect at the expense of intuition, creativity, and conscience, our educational systems yield spiritually imbalanced individuals. No discussion of a subject should be considered complete without an examination of its moral, philosophical, and ethical considerations, as well as a review of the intellectual and scientific data. When we ignore the ethics behind a particular issue, and instead focus on intellectual achievements, it's great for our egos. We can pat ourselves on the back and tell ourselves how smart we are. It deflates our egos, on the other hand, to realize that we are actually insignificant creatures on a speck of dust in a corner of the universe, and that we are only one of the millions of life forms on this speck, all of whom must live together.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 8:03 pm 
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Thanks joel for the inspiration and links

well have to give it a good look over...

Ill let you know


Tezza :thumb:

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 11:44 am 
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Faye, we have one and I did a lot of research and talking to different people before buying. We have a biosystem 2000 http://www.biosystems2000.com.au/ and personally I would not consider any of the others. I have a family friend who is an agent (he opertates out of Mt Barker however he services a heap of units up here) and he also recommends these (he was not in the business when I first bought mine).

I would recommend calling him and having a chat as he is very approachable and knowledgable. Servicing units means he is aware of many of the pitfalls of each system that is approved for use in WA. His details are below, tell him I recommended him.

Hudson Sewage Services - Gary
Waste Water & Sewage Treatment - Mt Barker, WA
2051 Woogenellup Rd North, Mt Barker WA 6324, Australia
(08) 9854 1001

I grow citrus, olives and veges on my irrigation area and all love it although we recently started using chlorine in the final polishing and I have noticed a difference in growth as I believe it is affecting the mocrobial activity in the soil and as of next service I am going to have it removed again (it is just a tube filled with pool tablets that the water poasses by before entering the pump out chamber).

If you are up my way and want to have a look just drop me a line, I think Chillidude has one as well.

Good luck,
Mike


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 11:49 am 
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Simo wrote:
A properly used septic and leach drain will rarely require any work and you can still use the water being leached out of the leach drain by strategically planting and orchard in the leach zone.


Faye, this is very true, although I love our system, if we lived on sand and had the space like you and did not have to have it (had to because of the creek). I would run a long leach drain with a row of citrus each side of it.

Maintenance is around $300 per year, then you have water and air pumps if they go and the ongoing electricity cost of running a big air pump 24/7 and a sump pump every tme the tank fills.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2011 2:38 pm 
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Thanks Mike,
I was thinking this morning that maybe I would just be spending time and money on something that just seems like a good idea. I did wonder if having more pumps and using more electricity would then be counter productive and cause me more headaches. Perhaps I will work on other areas first. So far the leach drain is working and will have to consider alternatives if and when the need arise, thanks all for the input.

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